PC Makers Embracing Ultrabooks; For Advisors, They Pack Power And Are Portable

 

I've been using an ultraportable laptop for about eight years. Ultraportables were predecessors to ultrabooks, but they cost twice as much. 

 

Getting the power of a desktop in a computer that weighs four pounds is great. But don't look at the $1000 price tags advertised on these machines if you run lots of apps at once, do your own video editing, or use your PC to perform other processor-intensive computing. You'll probably need to customize your ultrabook with a 2.8 GHz of faster Intel i7 processor and get eight gigs of RAM along with a 256 GB solid state hard drive. That's probably going to drive the price of the machine to about $2000, and that doesn't even include a service plan and some other extras.

 

For advisors who never need computing power because they do not run multiple apps at once or use their computers to run desktop apps for portfolio reporting or other power-hungry tasks, a low-cost ultrabook will be fine. Many advisors are already switching to iPads and other tablets and say they rarely need a laptop or desktop.

 

I'd be interested from A4A users running their businesses on tablets. What are the problems?

 

 

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