I went to Logitech’s site and searched “Anywhere MX.” Within seconds, I found the mouse has a three-year warranty. I went to my Amazon order to find the receipt, and  found the mouse was purchased 18 months ago.
 
I logged in to Logitech and posted a short note saying my moue was treating single clicks like double clicks, and I attached my receipt. A few days later, I received an email saying I would get a replacement if I took a picture of the broken mouse with its serial number written next to it. I complied and, a few days later, I received an email saying a replacement was on the way. Today it arrived.
 
This was the second time I had a problem with this mouse. In October 2011, the receiver stopped working and I filed a similar support message with Logitech and they sent me a new receiver. This time, Logitech sent a brand new mouse and receiver.
 
No one likes when stuff breaks. But it happens. Everything eventually breaks or fails to work properly. And herein lies a lesson.
 
Clients know stuff goes wrong. Orders get botched. You forget to return a call. Investments drop in value. People can deal with it — if you deal with them the right way. How you behave when stuff breaks is what matters.
 
Logitech made it easy for me find out that my broken mouse had a three-year warranty and it made it pretty easy to get a replacement. It fixed my problem.  
 
When you fix problems for clients, they become more loyal than ever. It builds trust. It's an opportunity.

 

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